Sex identification in avian species using DNA typing methods


Cerit H. , Avanus K.

WORLDS POULTRY SCIENCE JOURNAL, cilt.63, sa.1, ss.91-99, 2007 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 63 Konu: 1
  • Basım Tarihi: 2007
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1017/s0043933907001316
  • Dergi Adı: WORLDS POULTRY SCIENCE JOURNAL
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.91-99

Özet

Many avian species are considered sexually monomorphic. In monomorphic bird species, especially in young birds, sex is difficult to identify based on an analysis of their external morphology. For nestlings, sex identification is usually impossible by morphological examination. Sex identification in avian species is one of the key points of avian breeding and evolutionary studies. Through the knowledge of sex identification genes, poultry breeding programmes can be applied more successfully. Vent sexing, laparoscopy, steroid sexing and karyotyping are methods for sex identification used in monomorphic birds. However these methods are unreliable, time-consuming, and expensive while some of them could be painful and even life-threatening for birds. The sex of an individual is established from the genes located on sex chromosomes. Female birds carry one copy of both Z and W, and male birds carry two copies of Z avian sex chromosomes. However, there are many DNA techniques, the most reliable one is amplifying sex specific CHD1 gene by P2 - P8 primer pairs.
Many avian species are considered sexually monomorphic. In monomorphic bird
species, especially in young birds, sex is difficult to identify based on an analysis of
their external morphology. For nestlings, sex identification is usually impossible by
morphological examination. Sex identification in avian species is one of the key
points of avian breeding and evolutionary studies. Through the knowledge of sex
identification genes, poultry breeding programmes can be applied more successfully.
Vent sexing, laparoscopy, steroid sexing and karyotyping are methods for sex
identification used in monomorphic birds. However these methods are unreliable,
time-consuming, and expensive while some of them could be painful and even lifethreatening
for birds. The sex of an individual is established from the genes located
on sex chromosomes. Female birds carry one copy of both Z and W, and male birds
carry two copies of Z avian sex chromosomes. However, there are many DNA
techniques, the most reliable one is amplifying sex specific CHD1 gene by P2 - P8
primer pairs.