Assessment of DNA base oxidation and glutathione level in patients with type 2 diabetes


Dincer Y. , Akcay A. , Alademir Z., Ilkova H.

MUTATION RESEARCH-FUNDAMENTAL AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF MUTAGENESIS, cilt.505, ss.75-81, 2002 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Yayın Türü: Makale / Tam Makale
  • Cilt numarası: 505
  • Basım Tarihi: 2002
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1016/s0027-5107(02)00143-4
  • Dergi Adı: MUTATION RESEARCH-FUNDAMENTAL AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF MUTAGENESIS
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.75-81

Özet

The first aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between reduced glutathione (GSH) level, a powerful cellular antioxidant, and oxidative damage to DNA; and secondly, to see the effect of glycemic control on oxidative DNA damage in type 2 diabetics. We determined GSH level and, using the comet assay, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-sensitive sites which indicates oxidised guanine in freshly isolated blood from age-matched type 2 diabetics and controls. We found significant differences between men and women in the control group for both GSH and Fpg-sensitive sites. Therefore, we compared the controls and type 2 diabetics separately in men and women. GSH level of whole blood was found to be lower, Fpg-sensitive sites in leukocytes was found to be higher in the both type 2 diabetic men and women, as compared with their respective controls. When the diabetic group was divided into two groups as well-controlled diabetics and poorly-controlled diabetics with respect to glycosylated haemoglobine levels, it was found that Fpg-sensitive sites was significantly higher in the poorly-controlled diabetics than in the well-controlled diabetics in both the men and women. GSH level was lower in the poorly-controlled diabetics but not significantly. Fpg-sensitive sites were found to be moderately correlated with both glycosylated haemoglobine and GSH, and weakly correlated with glucose. Data indicate that decreased GSH level may be a contributory factor for enhanced oxidative DNA damage in type 2 diabetics; and chronic hyperglycemia derived from poorly-controlled diabetic conditions may induce oxidative DNA damage in these patients. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

The first aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between reduced glutathione (GSH) level, a powerful cellular antioxidant, and oxidative damage to DNA; and secondly, to see the effect of glycemic control on oxidative DNA damage in type 2 diabetics. We determined GSH level and, using the comet assay, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-sensitive sites which indicates oxidised guanine in freshly isolated blood from age-matched type 2 diabetics and controls. We found significant differences between men and women in the control group for both GSH and Fpg-sensitive sites. Therefore, we compared the controls and type 2 diabetics separately in men and women. GSH level of whole blood was found to be lower, Fpg-sensitive sites in leukocytes was found to be higher in the both type 2 diabetic men and women, as compared with their respective controls. When the diabetic group was divided into two groups as well-controlled diabetics and poorly-controlled diabetics with respect to glycosylated haemoglobine levels, it was found that Fpg-sensitive sites was significantly higher in the poorly-controlled diabetics than in the well-controlled diabetics in both the men and women. GSH level was lower in the poorly-controlled diabetics but not significantly. Fpg-sensitive sites were found to be moderately correlated with both glycosylated haemoglobine and GSH, and weakly correlated with glucose. Data indicate that decreased GSH level may be a contributory factor for enhanced oxidative DNA damage in type 2 diabetics; and chronic hyperglycemia derived from poorly-controlled diabetic conditions may induce oxidative DNA damage in these patients.