Concomitant Occurrence of Ovarian Remnant Syndrome, Transmissible Venereal Tumor and Stump Pyometra in A Bitch


Sontas H. , Altun D., Yilmaz O. T. , Arun S., Senunver A., Ekici H.

KAFKAS UNIVERSITESI VETERINER FAKULTESI DERGISI, cilt.16, ss.675-680, 2010 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi)

  • Cilt numarası: 16 Konu: 4
  • Basım Tarihi: 2010
  • Dergi Adı: KAFKAS UNIVERSITESI VETERINER FAKULTESI DERGISI
  • Sayfa Sayısı: ss.675-680

Özet

5 A 2.5-year-old, cross-breed bitch weighing 26 kg, was presented with two weeks history of vaginal bleeding. The bitch had undergone an ovariohysterectomy when it was 6 months old, and it had been regularly showing attractiveness to male dogs and even being mated with free-roaming dogs. On physical examination, the animal appeared healthy with no abnormalities other than vaginal bleeding. Upon vaginal digital palpation and vaginoscopic examination, an area of rough, cauliflower-like mucosa approximately 50 mm in diameter was determined on the left lateral wall just cranial to the urethral orifice. The dog had leukocytosis and hyperglycemia. Vaginal cytology revealed huge numbers of red blood cells, neutrophils, transmissible venereal tumor cells and some degree of intermediate and parabasal cells. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated two cystic structures with anechoic areas next to each kidney. The residual ovaries with cystic uterine remnants were removed via a midline laparotomy. Histopathological examination of the removed tissues revealed pyometra and cyst and papillary hyperplasia in the left ovary. Chemotherapy with slow infusions of vincristine was performed once a week for seven consecutive weeks. After the first vincristine administration, cessation of the vaginal bleeding and reduction in the size of the mass were observed. However, beginning from the fourth treatment to the last, the size or the color of the mass did not change. Ten months after the last vincristine treatment, the dog was free of vaginal bleeding and it was not possible to identify the neoplastic area on vaginal palpation and vaginoscopic examination.

A 2.5-year-old, cross-breed bitch weighing 26 kg, was presented with two weeks history of vaginal bleeding. The bitch had undergone an ovariohysterectomy when it was 6 months old, and it had been regularly showing attractiveness to male dogs and even being mated with free-roaming dogs. On physical examination, the animal appeared healthy with no abnormalities other than vaginal bleeding. Upon vaginal digital palpation and vaginoscopic examination, an area of rough, cauliflower-like mucosa approximately 50 mm in diameter was determined on the left lateral wall just cranial to the urethral orifice. The dog had leukocytosis and hyperglycemia. Vaginal cytology revealed huge numbers of red blood cells, neutrophils, transmissible venereal tumor cells and some degree of intermediate and parabasal cells. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated two cystic structures with anechoic areas next to each kidney. The residual ovaries with cystic uterine remnants were removed via a midline laparotomy. Histopathological examination of the removed tissues revealed pyometra and cyst and papillary hyperplasia in the left ovary. Chemotherapy with slow infusions of vincristine was performed once a week for seven consecutive weeks. After the first vincristine administration, cessation of the vaginal bleeding and reduction in the size of the mass were observed. However, beginning from the fourth treatment to the last, the size or the color of the mass did not change. Ten months after the last vincristine treatment, the dog was free of vaginal bleeding and it was not possible to identify the neoplastic area on vaginal palpation and vaginoscopic examination.