Insulin detemir improves glycemic control and reduces hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes: findings from the Turkish cohort of the PREDICTIVE (TM) observational study


Kurtoglu S., Atabek M., Dizdarer C., Pirgon O., Isguven P., Emek S., et al.

PEDIATRIC DIABETES, cilt.10, ss.401-407, 2009 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi)

Özet

Background: Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog designed to produce a superior pharmacokinetic profile to basal formulations of human insulin. It has shown consistently improved tolerability in comparison to neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin in adult cohorts, but there are relatively few publications involving pediatric cohorts.
Methods: The efficacy and safety of insulin detemir in children with type 1 diabetes was assessed using data from the Turkish cohort of PREDICTIVE (a large, multinational, observational) study. The children investigated were using basal–bolus therapy involving NPH insulin or insulin glargine at baseline but were switched to insulin detemir as part of routine clinical care by their physicians.
Results: Twelve weeks of treatment with insulin detemir significantly reduced mean hemoglobin A1c (9.7–8.9%, p , 0.001) and mean fasting glucose [185–162 mg/dL (10.3–9 mmol/L), p , 0.01]. Fasting glucose variability was also lower after treatment with insulin detemir than previously (on either NPH or glargine, p , 0.05). The frequencies of total, major and nocturnal hypoglycemic events were significantly reduced with insulin detemir relative to baseline, with an estimated mean of 6.89 fewer events/patient/yr overall (p , 0.001) and 2.6 fewer nocturnal events/patient/yr (p , 0.01). Weight and insulin dose remained relatively unchanged.
Conclusions: Twelve weeks of treatment with insulin detemir improved glycemic control and reduced hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes. This improved tolerability might allow further dose titration and therefore additional improvements in glucose control.