Transdermal Scopolamine for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis


APFEL C. C. , ZHANG K., GEORGE E., SHI S., JALOTA L., HORNUSS C., et al.

CLINICAL THERAPEUTICS, cilt.32, ss.1987-2002, 2010 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi)

  • Cilt numarası: 32 Konu: 12
  • Basım Tarihi: 2010
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1016/j.clinthera.2010.11.014
  • Dergi Adı: CLINICAL THERAPEUTICS
  • Sayfa Sayısı: ss.1987-2002

Özet

Background: Transdermal scopolamine (TDS) is a potential long-acting prophylactic antiemetic initially developed to prevent motion sickness. TDS is a centrally acting anticholinergic agent that was approved in 2001 by the US Food and Drug Administration for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Although TDS has been reported to be clinically efficacious in the prevention of PONV, several adverse events (AEs), such as sedation, dry mouth, blurred vision, central cholinergic syndrome, and confusion (particularly in elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment), are potential concerns.